The Vault

Spine Center of Texas continues the discussion about Radio Frequency Ablation in this second installment of our two-part blog post:

Just like any other injection, radio frequency (RF) ablation may cause a bit of discomfort for some patients. Sedation is not required, but some patients are given mild intravenous sedation during the procedure. RF does not recommend deep sedation as a safe alternative. Patients who undergo RF treatment may notice an increase in their neck or back pain for a few days being seeing improvements.

Here are some safety measures that you should follow if you are set to undergo this type of procedure:

  • Make sure not to eat or drink for at least 8 hours before your scheduled procedure.
  •  Discuss any side effects and complications before the said procedure is performed.
  • Arrange a ride home if you will be receiving sedation.
  • If you are taking high blood pressure medication, take it at the usual time with a sip of water.
  • Remember to inform your doctor if you are taking any type of anticoagulant medication (usually prescribed for patients with stroke, heart attack or other vascular occlusion) that can cause blood thinning or excessive bleeding. Examples of such medications include: Coumadin, Plavix, Aggrenox, Pletal, Ticlid, and Lovenox.

Once the procedure is done and you are safely discharged, make sure to prioritize rest and relaxation. You can apply an ice pack if you are experiencing pain at the puncture sites. Avoid driving until the next day if you’ve received intravenous sedation. When it comes to work, patients are generally advised to return to work the next day. Radio frequency ablation may be repeated if the patient’s pain returns, but only if the prior procedure was a success.

If you have any other questions regarding radio frequency ablation, don’t hesitate to contact Spine Center of Texas.

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